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The following article was published in Your Health Magazine. Our mission is to empower people to live healthier.
Quansheng Lu, CMD, PhD, LAc
Chinese Medicine For Neck Pain
Wholelife Chinese Medicine & Acupuncture
. http://www.wholelifeherb.com

Chinese Medicine For Neck Pain

What Is Chinese Medicine?

Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been used therapeutically in China for thousands of years and is growing in prominence in Europe and the United States. More and more people search the health care for Chinese medicine and other complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Chinese medicine includes many parts, and herbal tea and acupuncture are its main treatment methods.

In Chinese medicine theories, diseases come from the imbalance of yin and yang, and natural herbal formula and acupuncture can restore the body's balance of yin and yang.

Neck Pain Causes

Most neck pain may result from staying in the same position to long, which increases the tension of the neck. Neck pain may also arise from an injury. In adults, narrowing of the spinal canal in the neck (cervical spinal stenosis) is common. In Chinese medicine theory, external wind and cold, or injury, or excessive activities can block the flow of Qi and blood in the neck, which lead to neck pain.

Neck Pain Symptoms

The most common symptoms include a knot, stiffness, or acute pain in the neck. The pain may extend to your shoulders, upper back, or arms. Sometimes, you may have a headache, have trouble in moving or turning your head and neck, or have numbness, tingling or weakness in your arm.

Chinese Medicine Can Control Neck Pain

Chinese medicine therapy including herbal medicines and acupuncture for neck pain is very common and successful in China, even in Europe. Acupuncture is widely used for the treatment of neck and other musculoskeletal pain and there is some evidence supporting its effectiveness for short and long-term pain relief. An Australian randomized controlled trial was designed to compare the effectiveness of acupuncture with simulated acupuncture in patients with sub-acute and chronic whiplash-associated disorders. Patients received acupuncture treatment for 12 sessions during a six-week period, with three and six month follow-ups.

Participants receiving the real electro-acupuncture treatment had significantly greater reduction in pain intensity at three and six months respectively in comparison to the sham electro-acupuncture group.

Safety of Acupuncture

Although acupuncture is generally considered safe, it may cause dizziness, local internal bleeding, dermatitis, nerve damage, and/or increased pain (especially when the acupuncturist is not well-trained).

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