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The following article was published in Your Health Magazine. Our mission is to empower people to live healthier.
Howard Horowitz, DPM
Diabetic Wound Care
Bowie Foot & Ankle
. http://bowiefootandankle.com

Diabetic Wound Care

A diabetic foot ulcer is an open sore or wound that most commonly occurs on the bottom of the foot in approximately 15% of patients with diabetes. Of those who develop a foot ulcer, 6% will be hospitalized due to infection or other ulcer-related complication.

Diabetes is the leading cause of non-traumatic lower extremity amputations in the United States, and approximately 14-24% of patients with diabetes who develop a foot ulcer have an amputation. Research, however, has shown that the development of a foot ulcer is preventable.

Ulcers form due to a combination of factors, such as lack of feeling in the foot, poor circulation, foot deformities, irritation (such as friction or pressure), and trauma, as well as duration of diabetes. Patients who have diabetes for many years can develop neuropathy, a reduced or complete lack of feeling in the feet due to nerve damage caused by elevated blood glucose levels over time. The nerve damage often can occur without pain and one may not even be aware of the problem. Your podiatric physician can test feet for neuropathy with a simple and painless tool called a monofilament.

Vascular disease can complicate a foot ulcer, reducing the body’s ability to heal and increasing the risk for an infection. Elevations in blood glucose can reduce the body’s ability to fight off a potential infection and also retard healing.

Once an ulcer is noticed, seek podiatric medical care immediately to reduce the risk of infection and amputation, improve function and quality of life, and reduce health care costs.

The primary goal in the treatment of foot ulcers is to obtain healing as soon as possible. The faster the healing, the less chance for an infection.

There are several key factors in the appropriate treatment of a diabetic foot ulcer:

• Prevention of infection.

• Taking the pressure off the area, called “off-loading.”

• Removing dead skin and tissue, called “debridement.”

• Applying medication or dressings to the ulcer

• Managing blood glucose and other health problems.

Not all ulcers are infected; however if your podiatric physician diagnoses an infection, a treatment program of antibiotics, wound care, and possibly hospitalization will be necessary.

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